Help for Special Needs Parents from MyEdGPS

When you find out your child has special needs, no one gives you a manual. If you are lucky you find therapists and teachers and friends who know what they’re doing and will help you along the way. But if your child is 3 or older, you may find yourself hearing that strange acronym “IEP” and having no idea how to get one or what it should say or do.

We were really lucky with Graham’s first IEP (which means Individual Education Plan, by the way) because we had Graham’s Early Intervention and ABA teams there with us. They’d been to many of these meetings. We had our own little army there to fight to get Graham what he needed to help him learn.

But next year? It’ll just be me. I’ll be going in there by myself. And I’ll be at a table filled with people who do these meetings constantly, who see one kid after another, who don’t know my child the way I do. From here on out I feel like I’m coming at Graham’s education at a disadvantage. I need a roadmap. I need some help.

So I’m going to be a beta tester for MyEdGPS. I’m really excited about this site. A lot of us go through this battle alone without advocates or lawyers or supports. We don’t know what the official rules are, we just want the best for our kids.

MyEdGPS Exceptional Education Navigation1 300x260 Help for Special Needs Parents from MyEdGPS

The idea behind MyEdGPS is to give you that road map by providing you with tools to help you through your school’s processes and organize your IEP.

You need this. Because IEP’s are all based on laws. And laws are going to have specific steps you have to fulfill to get access to particular services. Here’s the thing: I’m a lawyer and I don’t have the time, energy or expertise to do this stuff right now. I have to continue to function day to day as my child’s parent and the research involved is extensive. I also have to make sure I don’t miss some crucial detail.

MyEdGPS has all these legal requirements already in their system and will help you get access to them. They even have letter generators and guides for you to use just the right language to trigger the help and services you need.

Maybe I’m a little hormonal but watching the video of how this all works and what it does for you gets me a little misty-eyed.

A difficult process becomes just a few clicks. Binders full of paperwork are now all organized for you online.

If this sounds like something you could use, please sign up to be a beta tester.  The deadline is this Wednesday. Whether your child already has an IEP or you think they might need one, whether they have autism difficulties or ADHD or dyslexia or don’t have any kind of diagnosis, you can help make MyEdGPS something amazing and it can help you, too.

The site is free. And it also offers access to professional advocates and specialists for a reduced fee should you decide you want them so you don’t have to go hunting them down.

As a beta tester you’ll be able to provide comments to make the site more useful while they prepare for their February launch.

With all the expensive therapies and specialists out there, the special needs parenting community needs all the free tools it can get. Please spread the word by sharing this post or the link to others you may know who could use it to help their child. You can also follow them on Twitter or Like them on Facebook.

This post is sponsored by MyEdGPS, I’m working with them to help get the word out but I’m beta testing for free. I feel really strongly that this could be an amazing tool so please pass it along on Twitter, Facebook, Email, etc. 

4 Responses to Help for Special Needs Parents from MyEdGPS

  1. Jessica– I posted and invited some facebook friends directly, using their facebook emails in the “Invite others” box.

    FYI:
    http://www.facebook.com/jimmy.hoffa.1975?fref=ts => jimmy.hoffa.1975@facebook.com

    Thanks for getting the word out, I just know this is going to be a GREAT resource.

  2. I’ve been on both sides of the IEP conference table and if this had been around when a school district was willing to throw my brilliant daughter in the garbage can, she could have stayed in a top-notch high school and not been sent on another detour of destructive behavior. Excellent grades do not mean excellent mental/emotional health. I used all the energy I could to advocate for my child and in the end I realized sadly that I was better off using that strength to save and steer my own child rather than to engage in a legal battle I couldn’t afford nor had stamina for any longer. Because in addition to fighting for support, I was ACTUALLY dealing with her very real mental and emotional issues and doing it solo took everything I had. And she was worth it. She’ll graduate with an associate’s degree and be working as a paralegal in a few months. She’s still a genius and plans to get an art degree as well.
    Thank you for this. I’ve got one with audio processing issues and all my requests for an SST have been blown off big time. I will use this tool!!!

Leave a reply

CommentLuv badge