How to Get More Book Club In Your Life

If you’re going to scroll right by this because you’re not a book club person, stop for just a second. I used to think the same thing, but I’ve found a bunch of different book clubs that work for me in a bunch of different ways. 

The Any Book Book Club

This is the invention of one of my fellow contributors at Book Riot. The Any Book Book Club frees you from the usual Book Club model. If you don’t like having to read something by a deadline, or having other people choose the book, or discussion questions, then this is the perfect book club for you. There is no assigned book, instead you just show up with a bunch of your reader friends and talk about what you’ve been reading that you love. Not only is it fun to see your bookish buds, you also get a bunch of recommendations to add to your to-read list.

read harderThis is the model we follow for the Read Harder Book Groups, too. You can find them in a whole bunch of cities now with more to come. We’ve been going in Boston since September and I’ve enjoyed every single one. Bookish people are a great bunch, and I’ve made several friends through our group. Plus it’s just so chill, everyone is accepting of different tastes, and there’s lots of note taking and comparing opinions and general goodness. If you’re that person who is always talking about books, this is a great place to get it all out. 

Or you could start your own!

The Book of the Month Club

I was invited to try out Book of the Month Club last year and I really enjoyed it. The model is super simple. Each month they give you 5 selections, you pick the one that sounds best to you, and they send it to you. There’s discussions online around the books, so if you’re not much for in-person book clubs, this is a great fit. And I’ve been very impressed with the picks. They tend to be very new releases, often very buzzy, and the selection usually includes nonfiction, crime novels, women’s fiction, and literary fiction. 

I am friends with a few people who work with and judge books for Book of the Month Club. My initial subscription was complimentary. I liked it so much that I took them on as an affiliate partner, so joining through me helps support DMTM at no extra cost to you.

 

You can skip any month where you don’t like the titles. You can read at your own pace, since the discussions stay up even after the month passes. Plus, you pay less than you’d pay for the book in a store. (1 month is $16.99 for a new release hardcover, and it’s as low as $11.99 if you sign up for a year.) PLUS they’re running a ridiculous sale now so you can get 3 months for half off (that’s $7.50 per book!) using code APR50. So head to Book of the Month Club quick and if you make it by April 21st you can still get one of this month’s selections. 

Meetup.com

If you don’t know many people in your area or you don’t have a local bookish crew, then meetup.com is a great place to look for local book clubs. This is how I found my favorite book club of all time, where we read mostly classics, and we had actual MEN and people of all ages. If you’re feeling particularly brave, you can start your own book club there. You do have to pay a fee to keep the listing up, but you also get to make it whatever book club you want. Cozy mysteries? Romances? Obscure fiction in translation? Go for it!

Facebook Book Clubs

Another great virtual option is to start your book club on Facebook. You can use polls to choose books so everyone gets a say, and put discussion questions in individual threads. Since most of your friends are there anyway, and you may have reader friends who aren’t local, you can all congregate there for discussions. I’ve had some great success with online book clubs, these can work on forums and message boards, too.

Office Book Clubs

Yes, I go to my book club at the office when I can. At first I was kind of skeptical, but ultimately the convenience won me over. I didn’t even have to go anywhere, I just stay a little late one evening a month. Plus our group brings snacks and treats that go with the book. And any book club with snacks is a book club I would like to be a part of. We are already all connected through office email and use the same calendars, so it makes planning really simple. 

This model works for any group you already see regularly: Church, school, neighborhood, etc. 

 

And a few tips to maximize your awesomeness once you’ve got your book club going:

  • Lean towards backlist titles (aka books that have already been released in paperback). That makes it a lot more accessible for people with a small budget or who get the book from the library and won’t have to wait in a long hold line.
  • Don’t forget to keep track of what you’re reading. Are you reading all male authors? All white authors? A diverse set of books is more appealing to a wide group and it makes for a more interesting mix. 
  • Connect with your book club on Goodreads. Once you have a feeling for who you mesh with, you can see what else they’re reading and get great book picks that way.
  • Reach out to authors! Remember when I got Lev Grossman to do a Q&A with my book club when we read The Magicians a few years ago? That was pretty cool and it really made for a more interesting discussion. Some authors will do Skype meetups with your book club, too, so check the author’s web page and Twitter.
  • Read a book with a movie or tv-show tie-in. That always generates a whole bunch of discussion about which was better. (Although you know it’s always the book.) And if there isn’t a show, maybe create your own dream cast as one of your book club questions?
  • If your club doesn’t have a dedicated genre focus, try different ones and don’t be afraid to try something new.
  • Keep up with local author visits. If an author is visiting for a new release, have your book club read one of their older titles and go to the reading and Q&A together.

I’d love to hear your best book club experiences, your best practices, and your favorite book club reads.

BeYourBestBook Club

Comments

  1. says

    After a few failed attempts at other ways to stay organized, we’ve found that a private facebook group is the easiest way to keep up with an in-person book club. Hosts can post their book choice and address. You can organize snacks and quickly rearrange (when there was a big snow storm and no parking at the host’s house, we mobilized on facebook and moved the book club to my house). I find myself posting about online author interviews, podcasts that go along with our books, and author events all the time.

    I’ve been in a couple of fabulous book clubs. My book club in Kansas used to go to author events together all the time. We are even organizing a reunion now that so many of us have moved away. Everyone in my Maryland book club actually reads the book. Last month we discussed Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, which was actually really fun, and a good example of a book (or play in this case) with a great movie adaptation. I love how book club stretches me to read books that I wouldn’t pick up on my own.
    JoLee recently posted..The Ruby Prince Blog Tour: Interview with Beth Brower + A Giveaway

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